18: ALLERGIES (SEASONAL ALLERGIES) – Histamines, Types Of Allergies, Five Classes Of Antibodies, And Supplements To Help

Spring has sprung, and a lot of us are feeling it in our eyes, noses, and throats. Listen in as Christine and Jimmy discuss seasonal allergies and what you can do to ease the transition between seasons!

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about what to do to ease the  in Episode 18.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 18:

1. Definition of Allergies- a damaging immune response by the body to a substance, especially pollen,
fur, a particular food (protein based), or dust, to which it has become hypersensitive. an example of
inflammation

2. Definition of Histamine: protein molecule produced thy basophils (a leukocyte or white blood cell)
and part of the Innate Immune system. The innate immune system provides a rapid response to a
wide range of invaders. They cause the blood vessels to dilate so the white blood cells can quickly
find and fight the infection or problem. As it relates to seasonal allergies, symptoms can include
sneezing, coughing, itchy or watery eyes, nasal congestion, and skin rashes.

A. Histamine intolerances come when your body can’t break down these histamines properly

B. High histamine levels are caused by:

1. Allergies (Immunoglobulin E or IgE reactions)

2. Bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)

3. Leaky Gut

4. Fermented alcohol like wine, champagne, and beer

5. Histamine rich foods

C. Histamine rich foods

1. Fermented alcohol like wine, champagne, and beer

2. Fermented foods like sauerkraut, vinegar, soy sauce, kefir, yogurt, and kombucha

3. Vinegar-containing foods like pickles, mayonnaise, and olives

4. Cured meats like bacon, salami, pepperoni, luncheon meats, and hot dogs

5. Soured foods like sour cream, sour milk, buttermilk, sourdough bread

6. Dried fruit like apricots, prunes, dates, figs, and raisins

7. Most citrus fruits and tomatoes

8. Aged cheeses like goat cheese

9. Nuts like walnuts, cashews, and peanuts (technically a legume)

10. Vegetables like avocados, eggplant, and spinach

11. Smoked fish and certain species of fish like mackerel, mahi-mahi, tuna, anchovies, and
sardines.

12. Chocolate

D. Histamine buildup causes many symptoms

1. Headache

2. Hypertension (high blood pressure)

3. Arrhythmia or accelerated heart rate

4. Flushing

5. Nasal congestion

6. Sneezing

7. Hives

8. Fatigue

9. Abdominal cramps

3. There can be several different types of allergies

A. Allergies to foods-allergies to foods according to the medical definition can only happen to some
type of protein based food. A sensitivity is where a person has an “allergic type” reaction to
foods that are not protein based.

1. Can be inherited

2. Most develop due to digestive problems and dietary stressors

a. Hypochlorhydria-too little stomach acid

b. Inability to digest fats which are needed for a healthy immune response

c. high blood sugars-deplete nutrients needed for a healthy immune system (zinc, Vitamin C,
Vitamin D, iodine—natural antibacterial and anti-viral agent) and reduces white blood cell
actibity

d. Poor adrenal function-cortisol regulates white blood cell activity

1. Too high of cortisol amounts in the body depresses the immune system
2. Too low of cortisol amounts in the body causes a runaway immune system

e. Dehydration-causes the blood and lymph to become viscous and nutrients and others
substances can’t effectively need to get where they need to go.

B. Allergies to Non-Food items

1. Environmental

a. Grass

b. Pollen

c. Perfume

d. Cosmetics

e. Latex

f. Different metals like nickel or gold

2. Animals like dogs, cats, and other animals

3. Medications-antibiotics like penicillin—dad has this

4. Five Classes Of Antibodies

A. IgM or Immunoglobulin M

1. 5%-10% of all antibodies

2. Found in blood and lymph

B. IgD or Immunoglobulin D

1. 0.2% of all antibodies

2. Found in the blood, lymph, and on the surfaces of B Cells as antigen receptors (antibody
protein that is not secreted but is anchored to the B-cell membrane that help fight infection.)

C. IgG or Immunoglobulin G

1. 80% of all antibodies

2. Found in blood, lymph, and intestines

3. Develop as a result of lifestyle- sex, age, alcohol consumption, smoking and common
metabolic abnormalities (hyperlactemia which is an Increased level of lactate– A salt or ester
of lactic acid in the blood–without evidence of lactic acidosis or shock, hemochromatosis
which is an iron metabolism disorder, Acid Lipase Disease—an inability to breakdown fats and
as a result fats build up in the cells of the body—is a lipid metabolism disorder

D. IgE or Immunoglobulin E

1. 0.1% of all antibodies

2. Involved in allergic or hypersensitivity reactions

3. Attach to Basophils/Mast Cells to induce histamine secretion

E. IgA or Immunoglobulin A

1. 10%-15% of all antibodies

2. Found in sweat, tears, saliva, mucus, milk, and gastrointestinal secretions (mucus, acid,
proteases like pepsin, trypsin, bromelain—break down proteins into their building blocks)

5. The antibody involved in allergic or hypersensitivity responses is Immunoglobulin E or IgE for short

A. These make up 0.1% of all antibodies

B. They attach to basophils or mast cells to induce histamine secretion

6. Supplements that can help seasonal allergies

A. Freeze Dried Stinging Nettle-a herbaceous plant that has jagged leaves covered with stinging hairs.

B. Quercetin- a plant pigment (flavonoid). It is found in many plants and foods, such as red wine,
onions, green tea, apples, berries, Ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort, American elder, and others

C. Zinc

D. Buffered Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)-a vitamin found particularly in citrus fruits and green
vegetables. Buffered vitamin C combines calcium ascorbate, magnesium ascorbate, and
potassium ascorbate to create a neutral pH vitamin C.

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 18:
Eating a whole foods diet will lessen the chances of a person from suffering from allergies of any type, even seasonal allergies

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17: THE IMMUNE SYSTEM – Lines Of Defense, Pathogens, And Immune-Supporting Nutrients

The Immune System protects the body from foreign substances, cells, and tissues by
producing what is referred to as an immune response. Listen in as Christine and Jimmy discuss this vital functionality of the human body and how to help it help YOU stay as healthy as possible!

Subscribe via: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | RSS | Android

Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about the importance of a strong immune system in Episode 17.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 17:

1. Definition of the immune system: protects the body from foreign substances, cells, and tissues by
producing the immune response.

2. Three lines of defense

A. Nonspecific Resistance/Barriers

1. Mechanical Barriers

a. Intact skin
b. Tears
c. Mucous and mucous membranes
d. Saliva
e. Cilia
f. Epiglottis

2. Chemical Barriers

a. Skin (perspiration)
b. Gastric juices-hydrochloric acid with a pH of 0.8 to 3
c. Lysozyme-an enzyme capable of breaking down cell walls of various bacteria. It is found
in perspiration, tears, saliva, nasal secretions, and tissue fluids

B. Nonspecific or “Innate” Immunity-white blood cells provide a rapid response to a wide range of
invaders. Think of this as your surveillance system
C. Specific or “Adaptive/Acquired” Immunity-white blood cells mount attacks on specific invaders
that escaped the Resistance/Barriers and Innate Immunity

3. Things the Immune System includes

A. The Thymus-helps develop T-lymphocytes or T cells which is an important type of white blood cell
used in fighting infection
B. Spleen-helps filter the blood for the immune system. Red blood cells are recycled here; platelets
(a small colorless disk-shaped cell fragment without a nucleus, found in large numbers in blood
and involved in clotting) and white blood cells (less technical term for leukocyte which include
lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, and macrophages) are stored
in the spleen. The spleen also helps fight certain kinds of bacterial infections that cause
pneumonia and meningitis.
C. Lymph Nodes-they are small bean-shaped structures that stores cells called lymphocytes (a type
of while blood cell) that fight infection
D. Intestines-our intestinal tract contains 60% of our immune system
E. Bone marrow-produces red blood cells (carries oxygen throughout the body and removes carbon
dioxide from the body), platelets (involved in clotting), and white blood cells (help fight infection)
F. Macrophages-a large white blood cell that can locate and eat particles like bacteria, viruses, fungi
and parasites
G. Lymphocytes-produce antibodies to destroy cells that might cause damage

1. B Cells-create Y-shaped proteins called antibodies and are developed in the bone marrow
2. T Cells-kills cells that have already been infected by an invader and are developed in the
Thymus
3. Natural Killer Cells-composed of innate immunity and are responsible for helping to fight
tunours and cells that are infected with viruses

H. Antibodies-blood protein produced in response to and counteracting a specific antigen (a toxin or
other foreign substance that induces an immune response in the body, especially the production
of antibodies)

4. Types of pathogens

A. Bacteria: completely independent, able to eat and reproduce quickly (can develop into millions
of cells in 4 hours)
B. Virus: 1/1000 smaller than a bacterial cell, not alive, attaches to a host cell and injects its
material into that cell and uses the genetic material to make new viruses-the host cell bursts and
releases the viruses
C. Parasites:

1. protozoa-are one celled organisms like Giardia (a type of infection in the small intestines
usually contracted by eating contaminated food or water) and Malaria (invades the red blood
cells)
2. Worms-like Pinworm (small white worm whose eggs can be inhaled through the air or
consumed through food) and Tapeworm (a flatworm that lives in the intestines and consumes
nutrients that have already been digested)

D. Fungus-plant-like organisms, many are useful and edible (mushrooms), some cause problems
(Candida), and there are over 100,000 species of fungi like yeast and molds

5. Good digestion is critical for good immune function

A. Proper stomach acid is needed to digest and absorb nutrients needed for good immune function
B. Proper stomach acid is needed to digest the proteins we eat so the poorly digested proteins don’t
irritate our intestines leading to Leaky Gut and Autoimmunity-60 to 80 percent of our immune
system is in the intestines. A decrease of good gut bacteria always leads to in increase in
harmful microbes because it reduces the amount of good bacteria that can fight the bad bacteria
C. The liver and gallbladder need to be working well to digest and break down the fats we consume
(fats are needed in Prostaglandin formation which helps control and regulate inflammation)

1. Prostaglandin 1 or PG1-comes from Omega-6 fatty acids which are anti-inflammatory in nature

A. Pumpkin seeds
B. Raw sunflower seeds
C. Pine nuts
D. Pistachio nuts

2. Prostaglandin 2 or PG2-comes from Saturated fatty acids which are inflammatory in nature;
inflammation, in this context is good because it allows the body to create a pathway for the
immune system to do its job.

A. Full fat dairy products
B. Fatty cuts of meat like beef, pork, and lamb
C. Lard

3. Prostaglandin 3 or PG3-comes from Omega-3 fatty acids which are anti-inflammatory in nature.

A. Cod liver oil
B. Salmon
C. Walnuts
D. Chia seeds

Note: Histamines work with prostaglandins and are created by Basophils, a leukocyte or white blood
cell, and histamines increase the permeability of blood cells to allow the white blood cells to
move to the infected or injured tissues.

6. Good blood sugar regulation is important for optimal immune health

A. Stress responses by the adrenal glands depress the immune system. The body has to decide if it’s
going to lower blood sugar or fight infection
B. Blood sugar levels that are consistently high reduce white blood cell activity because high blood
sugar levels cause high cortisol levels and cortisol is the hormone that regulates white blood cells

1. High cortisol levels decrease lymphocytes and other immune cells
2. Low cortisol causes an overactive immune system-white blood cells are in excess and this
causes inflammation.
3. blood sugar levels that are consistently high deplete the body of nutrients needed for a
healthy immune system

1. Vitamin C-certain cells of the immune like phagocytes and T-cells system need vitamin C to
do their job
2. Vitamin D-helps the body produce over 200 antimicrobial peptides (2 or more amino acids)
which help fight infections
3. Vitamin E-antioxidant that helps fight infection
4. Zinc-helps regulate the immune response
5. Beta-carotene-precursor to vitamin A which is needed for healthy mucous membranes
6. Calcium-helps support white blood cell activity
7. Iodine-a natural anti-bacterial and anti-viral agent

7. Proper hydration is needed for a healthy immune system

A. Water is needed to keep the passageways of the lungs moist for easier breathing
B. Proper hydration supports good lymphatic flow which allows the immune system cells to
travel easier throughout the body
C. If you are dehydrated, it can increase the histamine response which plays a role in allergies and
asthma

8. Ways we rid the body of invaders

A. Coughing,
B. Sneezing
C. Defecating
D. Vomiting
E. Tears
F. Saliva

7. Immune Supporting Nutrients

A. Vitamins A, C, D, and E
B. Zinc
C. Selenium
D. Essential Fatty Acids

1. Linoleic Acid (LA)
2. Alph-Linolenic Acid (ALA)

E. Aloe Vera-a gelatinous substance obtained from Aloe plants
F. Garlic-an herb closely related to the onion family
G. Licorice-from a plant in the pea family obtained from it’s roots
H. Echinasea- derived from a North American coneflower in the Daisy family that has antibiotic and
wound healing properties

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 17:
It’s important that we have good digestive function, proper hydration, and optimal blood sugar regulation so that our immune system can function at its best.

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16: TRAVELING — Tips, Tricks, And How To Stay Healthy On The Road

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about traveling in Episode 16.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 16:

— Why people tend to lose track of their health and nutrition while traveling

— How you can manage circadian rhythms getting out of balance

— How to make better food choices

— Breakfast at hotels

— Planning to manage situations where there will be poor food choices

— Packing good snacks

— Supplements for traveling

— Dealing with family that don’t eat the way you do

— and much more

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15: THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM – Glands, Minerals, Weight Distribution, Blood Sugar

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about the endocrine system in Episode 15.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 15:

1. What is the Endocrine System? The collection of glands that produce hormones that regulate
metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and
mood, among other things.

2. Definition of hormones: Regulatory substances produced in an organism and transported in tissue
fluids such as blood to stimulate specific cells or tissues into action.

3. Glands of the endocrine system and the minerals they depend on:

A. Hypothalamus: Located in the brain, this is the part of the brain that controls the endocrine
system. Think of it as a control center. It links the nervous system to the endocrine system
through the Pituitary Gland. It releases at least 7 to 8 hormones that control the Pituitary Gland.
The hypothalamus needs chromium for good health.

1. Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone (TRH)-a releasing hormone produced by the hypothalamus
that stimulates the release of thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone or TSH) and prolactin
from the pituitary gland.
2. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH)-signals the pituitary gland to create two hormones
called leutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)
3. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH)-stimulates the pituitary gland to produce and
release growth hormone into the bloodstream. Once growth hormone is releases into the
blood, it has an affect on just about every tissue of the body to control metabolism and
growth.
4. Corticotropin-releasing Hormone (CRH)-Its main function is to stimulate the pituitary gland to
produce Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH)
5. Somatostatin – it regulates the secretion of hormones coming from the pituitary gland,
including growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone. It also inhibits the secretion of
pancreatic hormones which include Glucagon and Insulin
6. Dopamine – this functions as a neurotransmitter which is a chemical released by neurons or
nerve cells to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain has many distinct dopamine
pathways and one of these pathways plays a big role in reward-motivated behavior.

B. The Pituitary Gland: Located in the brain, it has also been described as the “master gland”
because it secretes hormones that control other endocrine glands. It needs manganese for good
health

1. Oxytocin-controls key aspects of the reproductive system and some aspects of human
behavior
2. Prolactin-hormone that helps women produce milk after childbirth and it’s important to both
male and female reproductive health
3. Leutenizing Hormone-triggers ovulation and stimulates the production of testosterone
4. Anti-diuretic Hormone (ADH)-tells your kidneys how much water to conserve; it also constantly
regulates and balances the amount of water in your blood
5. Human Growth Hormone (HGH)-encourages growth in children and adolescents, helps to
regulate body composition as well as bodily fluids and muscle and bone growth, helps regulate
sugar and fat metabolism, and it possibly helps with heart function

C. The Pineal Gland also known as the Third Eye: This gland is also in the brain and it produces
melatonin which helps with circadian rhythm. It is also known as the Third Eye because the
Third Eye chakra in the Hindu system is located in the center of the forehead which is near the
pineal gland. It depends on iodine and boron for good health.

D. The Thyroid Gland: It depends on iodine and tyrosine. It is located in the front of the neck just
below the Adams apple and is considered to be one of the major glands in the regulation of
metabolism. It produces:

1. thyroxine (T4) which gets converted to its active form, triiodothyronine (T3) with the help of
selenium. T3 controls basil metabolic rate
2. Calcitonin-responsible for the uptake of calcium to the bone

E. The Parathyroid Gland: It’s located in the neck behind the thyroid and produces parathormone
or PTH which is associated with the growth of muscle and bone and distribution of calcium and
phosphate in the body. It depends on calcium for good health.

F. The thymus: The thymus lays across the trachea and bronchi in the upper thorax. It produces
thymosin which triggers the immune system by activating the T-Cells and T-Lymphocytes which
are white blood cells associated with antibody production. The thymus needs zinc for good
health.

G. The pancreas: It lies behind the stomach and needs chromium for good health. The pancreas
produces:

1. Insulin by the Beta Cells which is responsible for the conversion of glucose to glycogen,
shuttling glucose into the cells, and the conversion of excess glucose to fat
2. Glucagon by the Alpha Cells which is responsible for the conversion of glycogen to glucose

H. The adrenal glands: They are on top of the kidneys and they rely on copper for good health.
They produce:

1. Adrenalin which prepares the body for fight or flight
2. noradrenalin-which has similar effects to adrenalin
3. corticosteroids that include cortisol, cortisone, and corticosterone

I. The ovaries: They are located in the lower abdomen and they rely on selenium for good health.
They produce:

1. Estrogen which is responsible for the break-down of the uterus wall
2. progesterone which builds up and maintains the uterus wall for embedding of fertilized egg
and is also associated with body hair, breast enlargement, and physical changes in the body

J. The testes: They’re located outside the pelvic cavity and produce testosterone which is
responsible for the development and function of male sex organs and is associated with body
hair, muscle development, and voice change. They rely heavily on selenium for good health.

K. The prostate: It’s about the size of a walnut located between the bladder and the penis. It
produces prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which help keep the sperm in liquid form. The
prostate relies on zinc for good health.

4. People with different endocrine issues carry weight on specific parts of the body

A. If someone has adrenal gland problems through prolonged stress, cortisol is released and stores
fat around the most vital organs which are in your midsection. Thus, a person with adrenal issues
will carry more weight around their midsection.
B. People with thyroid issues tend to carry weight all over since the thyroid controls the metabolism
in all of your cells.
C. For people with problems with their ovaries, they will tend to carry extra weight around their hips
and lower stomach area.
D. If a person has liver problems, they will tend to carry extra weight around their body but have
thin legs

5. Blood sugar imbalances mess up the entire endocrine system because not only are the pancreas,
liver, and adrenal glands all necessary for blood sugar regulation but they are also heavily involved
in the endocrine system.

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 15:
It is very important to make sure blood sugar levels are normalized and under control before addressing any endocrine problem you have because blood sugar imbalances disrupt the entire endocrine system.

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14: SLEEP – The Four Stages, Benefits, And How To Optimize Sleep

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about the importance of sleep in Episode 14.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 14:
1. Definition of sleep: a condition of body and mind such as that which typically recurs for several
hours every night, in which the nervous system is relatively inactive, the eyes closed, the postural
muscles relaxed, and consciousness practically suspended.

2. Stages of sleep

A. Awake-resting with eyes closed
B. Stage 1: transitional sleep,

1. Dreamless sleep
2. Light sleep
3. This stage is often what happens when someone takes a power nap. You can be easily
awoken.

C. Stage 2: Typical Sleep

1. This is also light sleep.
2. If taking a power nap, this is the stage you want to wake up from.

D. Stage 3: beginning of deep sleep

1. This is where physical repair happens and the brain filters data from the day.
2. It’s harder to be awoken from this stage.
3. This is when the body repairs muscles and tissues, stimulates growth and development,
boosts immune function, and builds up energy for the next day.

E. Stage 4: R.E.M. or Rapid Eye Movement

1. This is where you dream.
2. Mental and emotional clearing happen during this stage
3. Your brain makes connections emotionally and consolidates information to be stored in your
long term memory.
4. You usually enter REM sleep after you’ve been asleep for 90 minutes.
5. It’s harder to be awoken from this stage.
6. Each REM stage can last up to one hour.
7. An average adult has 5 to 6 R.E.M. cycles a night.
8. The length of R.E.M. cycles increases as the night progresses. This is why there’s a good
chance you’ll awaken from dreaming in the morning.

3. Facts about stages of sleep

A. These different stages last different amounts of time depending on age.
B. Sleep happens cyclically starting with stage 1 going through stage 4 (REM) and back to 1.
C. A complete sleep cycle can take 90 to 110 minutes with each stage lasting from 5-15 minutes
(with the exception of R.E.M).
D. We need 7-9 hours of sleep a night. Some people on a ketogenic lifestyle have reported needed
less sleep.

4. Benefits of sleeping

A. Improves memory-strengthens memories and you can practice skills learned while awake (this is
called consolidation)
B. Helps reduce inflammation-people who get more sleep have less inflammatory proteins
(C-Reactive proteins) floating in their blood than those who get less sleep. These inflammatory
proteins lead to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, and other inflammatory conditions

C. Helps weight maintenance or weight loss (helps prevent cravings)

1. Blood sugars tend to be higher if you get less sleep.
2. Cortisol is also higher in those who get less sleep.
3. Insulin, a fat storing hormone, tends to be higher in those who get less sleep.

D. Helps prevent depression

1. Our ability to regulate emotions decreases after a poor night’s sleep.
2. We are in need of social interactions so if you get a poor night’s sleep, you are more likely to
cancel social events because of being tired.
3. The Amygdala, an almond shaped area of the brain, plays an important role in our emotions
and anxiety levels. People with less sleep showed a higher amygdala response, leading to less
control over emotions and greater anxiety levels.

E. Helps with the detoxification process. We are in a parasympathetic state when sleeping and
detoxification is a parasympathetic process. Our bodies detoxify when we sleep.

5. Things we can do to get more sleep

A. Limit exposure to “blue light” at night. Use blue blocker glasses and/or use the “Night Shift” on
devices. You can also get orange or red bulbs to put in your lamps at night.
B. Expose your eyes to sunlight early in the day and turn down house lighting at night. This helps
to establish your circadian rhythm by producing the proper hormones at the right time
(melatonin for sleep, and cortisol for waking up)
C. Don’t eat to soon before going to bed. Eating too close to bedtime can keep you awake at
night. The body has to spend it’s energy on digesting the food you ate rather than detoxifying
so your body doesn’t heal properly. The digestion of food can keep you from getting to sleep.
D. Don’t exercise too soon before going to bed. Exercise increases stress in the body (raises
cortisol) and the elevation of cortisol can keep you from getting to sleep in a timely manner.
E. Take a warm shower or bath using lavender. I have found that taking a warm shower helps me
relax. We all are different, though.
F. Take melatonin or magnesium.

1. If using melatonin, only take it 2 to 3 times a week. If you take
it too much, your body can “forget” how to make it’s own. The liquid form of melatonin is
best. When I take it, I usually take 10mg with the dropper. Everybody’s needs are different.
You may find you don’t need that much.
2. If taking magnesium, take Magnesium Glycinate. Magnesium Citrate can cause diarrhea

G. Limit the amount of scary or action filled tv right before going to bed. This can raise cortisol
which will make it harder for you to get to sleep.

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 14:
Sleep affects so many aspects of how our body functions. It’s important to make sure we are doing all we can to get adequate sleep.

 

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13: GUT HEALTH – Good & Bad Microbes, Consequences Of Too Many Bad, Benefits Of Having Mostly Good

Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about the gut microbiome in Episode 13.

Subscribe via: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | RSS | Android

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 13:

1. Microbial cells outnumber our human cells 10 to 1.
2. We have 2 to 4 pounds of microbes living in us
3. Microbiota refers to everything that lives in the gut tube. These can be beneficial or
harmful

A. Beneficial microbes-most fall within these two categories:

1. Lactobacillus
2. Bifidobacterium

B. Harmful microbes

1. Parasites
2. Yeast
3. Fungus
4. Viruses

4. Everyone has a different composition of gut bugs-these compositions in each person can change
due to age, diet, or geography. There are 2 different kinds of microbes: Transient and Native

A. Transient Microbes-Most common strains are from lacto and bifido species-these are
the main ones used to create probiotic supplements and cultured foods. Lactobaccilus
Acidophilus is the most common and versatile probiotics.

1. They come into the body to do their work then leave through the stool-very transient.
2. They work with other microbes that are native in nature.
3. We acquire these transient microbes from dietary sources

B. Native microbes-bactoroids, bacillus, Streptomyces

1. Enter our bodies through the air, soil and water supply (environmental sources)
2. These buggers are more resistant to stomach pH and more resilient to antibiotics
3. These native microbes have anti-fungi, anti-parasitic, and anti-viral properties

5. Things that can go wrong when we don’t have a population of good gut microbes

A. Excess bloating
B. Chronic ear infection
C. Yeast infections
D. Diarrhea
E. Constipation
F. Flatulence
G. Nail fungus
H. Hormonal imbalances
I. Eczema
J. Acne

6. We need good gut microbes to:

1. Help protect the intestinal wall
2. Produce vitamin K2, and three B vitamins, B1 or Thiamine, B2 or Riboflavin, and B12 or
cobalamin
3. Absorb nutrients
4. Help digest foods
5. Balance intestinal pH
6. Fight harmful microbes
7. Help improve bowel transit time
8. Have good mental health-90% of the body’s serotonin is produced in the intestines
7. There are many things that can permanently affect the composition of our microbiome:

A. Stress
B. Diet high in sugar and refined carbs
C. Contraceptives
D. Vaccinations
E. Overuse of antibiotics or other prescription drugs
8. Food sources of probiotics
A. kombucha (fermented tea)
B. Kefir (fermented milk)
C. Sauerkraut (fermented cabbage)
D. Pickles (fermented cucumbers)
E. Kimchi (Korean dish using fermented vegetables, spices and seasonings)
F. Full fat raw dairy, especially goat’s and sheep’s milk like milk, cheese and yogurt
G. If you want to do a plant-based ketogenic diet:

1. Tempeh (fermented soybeans)
2. Miso (fermented soybean, barley, or brown rice with koji which is a fungus)
3. Natto (Japanese dish with fermented soybeans)

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 13:
We need to make sure our gut health stays as healthy as possible so we can have good digestive function, a healthy immune system, and good mental health.

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12: VITAMINS – Classifications, Roles, Signs Of Deficiency, And Food Sources

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about vitamins in Episode 12.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 12:

1. Facts about vitamins

A. In 1905, an English scientist named William Fletcher was the first to make the connection between lack of vitamins in food and sickness. He was researching the causes of the disease, Beriberi. Beriberi is a B1 (Thiamine) deficient related disease that causes impairment of the nerves and heart. Symptoms include loss of appetite, digestive irregularities, and numbness and weakness in the limbs and extremities. In 1906, Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins, an English Biochemist, made the discovery that certain “food factors” were important to health. The concept of vitamins (vital amines), was formulated in 1912 by Casimir Funk, a Polish biochemist. The “e” was dropped several years later when it was discovered that vitamins were not nitrogen-containing amines. Casimir Funk discovered B1 in 1912 and together, Funk and Hopkins came up with the hypothesis of deficiency disease that says a lack of vitamins can make you sick. https://www.thoughtco.com/history-of-the-vitamins-4072556
B. Compose less than 1% of our body
C. Most vitamins cannot be manufactured by the body so we have to get them from external
sources
D. The vitamins the body can make are D and K

1. D is manufactured in the skin when the skin is exposed to sunlight high in the sky.
2. K, specifically K2, is manufactured by the good gut bacteria in our gut, but it is only a small fraction of what we need for the body to perform its functions so supplementing is important.

E. Vitamins function best when they have the cofactors with them like trace minerals, enzymes and other vitamins.

2. Classifications of vitamins

A. Fat soluble

1. Vitamin A
2. Vitamin D
3. Vitamin E
4. Vitamin K

B. Water soluble

1. The B vitamins
2. Vitamin C
3. Inositol
4. Choline

3. Roles of Vitamins in the body

A. They act as helpers in metabolic processes

1. The metabolism of carbohydrate, protein, and fat
2. The production of stomach acid (B6)
3. The detoxification process, specifically Phase 1 (B2)

B. Support tissue growth
C. They support digestion, elimination, and immune function.
D. They help prevent deficient related disorders and health problems from happening

4. Signs of vitamin deficiency

A. Folate/folic acid (B9)-Mouth sores and pale skin
B. Inositol-Poor brain function, hair loss, high LDL, and eczema
C. Vitamin A-Dry eyes, dry skin, bright lights at night bothersome, trouble distinguishing between blues and purples
D. Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)-Loss of appetite, pain in limbs swollen feet or legs
E. Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)-Anemia, nerve damage, sluggish metabolism, sore throat
F. Vitamin C-Bruising, bleeding gums, fatigue, loss of appetite
G. Vitamin D-Thin or brittle bones, joint pain, fatigue, depression, getting sick often, impaired wound healing
H. Vitamin E-Muscle weakness, Abnormal eye movements, vision problems
I. Vitamin K2-Easy bruising, excessive bleeding from wounds, blood in urine or stool

5. B And G Complexes

A. B complexes

1. Alcohol soluble
2. Heat stable
3. Stimulating
4. Helps carbohydrate metabolism
B-Person Needs B1 (Thiamine), B4, B6, And B12-These people are often hypotensive (low blood pressure), craves sugar, feels bad or run down, gets sick often, and tends toward Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

B. G complexes

1. Alcohol insoluble
2. Unstable with heat
3. Relaxing
4. Helps metabolize fats

G-Person Needs B2 And Associated B Vitamins like B3, PABA (para-aminobenzoic acid, folic acid, the lipotropic factors, choline, inositol, and betaine-These people are often hypertensive (high blood pressure), crave alcohol, feels good or pumped up, does not get sick often, and tends toward Myocardial Infarction.

6. Food sources of vitamins

A. Folic Acid/Folate (B9)- Beets, strawberries, broccoli, spinach, avocados, collard greens, turnip greens, okra, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, egg yolks, and liver B. Inositol-Nuts, seeds, beef, liver, and green leafy vegetables
C. Vitamin A- Liver, fish, egg yolks, butter, parsley, kale, chili peppers, dandelion root, collard greens, blueberries, whitefish, cabbage, sauerkraut, and cod liver oil
D. Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)-Pork, beef, liver, heart, kidneys, dandelion root, eggs, sunflower seeds, brazil nuts, and pecans
E. Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)- Eggs, meat, milk, poultry, fish, liver, lamb, natural yogurt, mushrooms, spinach, almonds, and sun-dried tomatoes
F. Vitamin C- Fennel, radishes, strawberries, blueberries, red peppers, kale, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, sauerkraut, and green peppers
G. Vitamin D- Fish like sardines, salmon, mackerel, and tuna, cod liver oil, eggs, milk, cheese, mushrooms, and caviar. You can also get vitamin D from getting out in the sunlight.
H. Vitamin E- Cod liver oil, sunflower seeds, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, Swiss chard, mustard greens, spinach, turnip greens, kale, pine nuts, avocados, broccoli, parsley, and olives
I. Vitamin K- Organ meats, full fat cheeses, grass fed butter and cream, animal fats, egg yolks, turnip greens, broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, sauerkraut, pickles, and asparagus

Nutritional Pearl for Episode 12:
It is important to make sure digestion is working at its best so you can absorb and use all the vitamins you are consuming

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– NutritionalTherapy.com

11: LIVE FROM THE NTA CONFERENCE – Hanging Out With NTPs At The Nutritional Therapy Association

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy recap the recent NTA conference NutritionalTherapy.com and bring you testimonials from other attendees in Episode 11.

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 11:

  • What is an NTP
  • Who are the NTA
  • Interest in Keto from NTPs
  • Speakers at the conference
  • How the conference impacted their upcoming book
  • Testimonials from:
    • Gray Graham
    • Mackenzie
    • Stephanie
    • Patty
    • Hannah
    • Moriah
    • Anne
    • Jeniffer
    • Jodi
    • Lorraine
    • Melissa
    • Lucy
    • Mickey

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– NutritionalTherapy.com

10: DIGESTIVE DYSFUNCTION – Brain, Mouth, Stomach, Pancreas, Gallbladder, Small Intestine, Large Intestine

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Welcome to The Nutritional Pearls Podcast! Focusing on topics that include digestion, adrenal fatigue, leaky gut, supplementation, electrolytes, stomach acid, and so much more, “The Nutritional Pearls Podcast” features Christine Moore, NTP and is hosted by Jimmy Moore, host of the longest running nutritional podcast on the Internet.  Sharing nuggets of wisdom from Christine’s training as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner and Jimmy’s years of podcasting and authoring international bestselling health and nutrition books, they will feature a new topic of interest and fascination in the world of nutritional health each Monday. Listen in today as Christine and Jimmy talk all about carbohydrates in Episode 9.

 

Here’s what Christine and Jimmy talked about in Episode 10:

– 1. Review of Digestion
–– A. Digestion happens north to south
–– B. Proper stomach pH is supposed to be between 1.5 and 3
–– C. Zinc and B6 are needed to produce stomach acid
– 2. Dysfunction in digestive process
–– A. Dysfunction in the brain: Sympathetic State—doing other activities or being stressed while eating
–– B. Dysfunction in the mouth: Not chewing food thoroughly (for about 30 seconds); signal not
received from the brain to have the mouth release salivary amylase.
–– C. Dysfunction in the stomach: Not having enough stomach acid. 90% of Americans don’t
produce enough stomach acid (Jonathon Wright, MD came up with this using the Heidelberg
Gastrotelemetry equipment to check the stomach pH on thousands of patients AND
Dr. George Goodhart, a chiropractor, came to the same conclusion using kinesiological and
functional assessment).
––– 1. Food, especially protein doesn’t get broken down
––– 2. Allows foreign invaders to pass through to the rest of the digesting system. Helicobacter (H)
Pylori (stomach ulcers caused by bacteria) happens because of inadequate stomach acid
––– 3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) actually happens because of too little stomach acid.
Poorly digested foods cause a back-up in the esophagus oftentimes because the cardiac
sphincter is weak. Since the acid content is higher in the stomach, the back flow burns the
esophagus.
––– 4. If stomach pH is not right, the pyloric sphincter won’t release the stomach contents into
the duodenum

Remember: Carbs ferment, proteins putrefy and fats rancidify

–– D. Dysfunction in the Pancreas: If pH of chime (digested food) is not correct, Secretin won’t be
released to trigger the pancreatic juices needed to further break down food.
–– E. Dysfunction in the Gallbladder: If pH of chime is not correct, then CCK won’t be released to
trigger bile to digest the fats we eat.
–– F. Dysfunction in the small intestine: Undigested foods will cause gut flora to become
imbalanced and it will also cause irritation to the intestinal lining causing increased
permeability leading to Leaky Gut and therefore, autoimmune conditions.
–– G. Dysfunction in the large intestine: Undigested food can clog the ileocecal valve (valve leading
from the small intestine to the large intestine) Undigested food can cause inflammation
leading to colitis, irritable bowl syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, Celiac Disease

Nutritional Pearls For Episode 10:
1. Being in a parasympathetic state when eating is very important .
2. Proper stomach acid is imperative.

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LINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 10

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– SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Become A Nutritional Therapy Practitioner
– JIMMY’S KETO LIVING SUPPLEMENT LINE: Try the KetoEssentials Multivitamin and Berberine Plus ketogenic-enhancing supplements